zeldathemes
Real insight on French culture from a French native point of view.
Mostly run by Em, 26, living in Paris.
Welcome to AwesomeFrench !
Liberté, Egalité, Croque au Comté
this is might be a strange question, but do you know how a pied-noir accent supposedly sounded or sounds (according to stereotypes perhaps)? my french history professor mentioned that the accent apparently used to be ridiculed and parodied, but he had no idea what it sounded like.

Anonymous

Oh it’s just extremely southern, very warm, very singing. It’s often parodied because it’s an extremely intuitive accent, genuinely spontaneous. So that can be really funny because “regular” French is quite tempered and hushed sometimes. 

Florence Foresti made a parody about it. She does it grossly but it’s just to give you an idea. :) 

Is there a big difference between the accents of northern and southern France? If so, could you tell me them?

Anonymous

Yeah, there’s a lot of differences.

Southern tends to formulate every letter and makes it harmonious by spending more or less time of vowels. It’s a guttural accent, which means Southern people’ voice is quite deep, punctuated with a lot of exhalations. It sounds like formed down the gullet and shaped by the mouth, it inspires me amplitude.The rhythm is created by the combination of speed and slow vowels, exhalations and deep sounds. The result is quite melodious, that’s why we call it the “sun accent” or the “singing accent”.

Northern accent is a “head voice”, falsetto in English I believe. It’s quite a high pitched tone, with particularly intense notes. It’s mostly formed in the throat/nose and shaped by the mouth. It’s a fast accent which tends to make some parts silent when not truly necessary to understand a word, especially “e” sounds (Ex: they’d say “Brul-ri” for Brulerie, instead of “Bru-leh-ri-e” in Southern accent). Also, the consonants are very intense, the rhythm shapes into a fast and intense series of hard consonants and high vowels. There’s no particular melody, it’s quite an “immediate” accent.

To me (and that’s just my opinion), Southern accent seems much easier to understand when you’re foreign because each letter can clearly be heard. It literally dissects the words -a little too much even. However, if you come from a Nordic/Germanic country, Northern might be better because the sounds are inspired from Germanic accents, so you’ll most likely find it quite natural.

Want to know more : http://awesomefrench.tumblr.com/tagged/accent

Salut Em :) I love your blog! I just wanted to ask whether there is a huge difference between the Swiss French and the French French. I was in Lausanne and the people there told me that they don't really have a special accent so I was wondering. Merci beaucoup!


Haha… When it comes to French language, you can ask whoever you want, they’ll never tell you they have an accent. Like really, you can ask anyone, in France, in Switzerland, Québec, wherever you want, they’ll always say “We, we don’t have an accent, but them, oh gosh, they got such a weird accent”. There’s a sort of competition between all francophonies/Regional accents about who will insult the other accents best. This is a very weird pride of being the best, and Anglophone countries are MUCH wiser than us on that topic. MUCH MUCH wiser. 

Now, all hypocrisy apart, the truth is that languages are lively things that are altered by many things like History, Geography and diasporas and it’s specifically true about French. Explanation >

French and European accents :

France is a country stuck between two main worlds, the Latin World and the Germanic World. We steal influences from both, we always did, we always do. The closer you get from Spain and Italy, the smaller becomes the frontier between Latin accent and French. The same thing about the North, the closer you get from Germany and Belgium, the harder become the accents. That’s the reason why we call French the language of love. We hold both crucial features for love : passion and warmth from the South, harshness and coldness from the North. French is like playing cat and mouse, that’s what makes French such an interesting language. We can adapt to whatever world we want because our language itself is literally born from them. Denying its influences, its accents, is denying its sheer nature. 
Also, in today’s France, the accents origins are slightly altered because we travel, we move a lot. We’re in a modern world, with trains, planes, people moving all the time, communities recreating themselves in new regions… It pretty much bombards the cliché you find in 99% foreign language books saying the most “natural” French accent is located right under Paris and the rest is just more or less accurate copies of it. That’s just plainly outdated horse-shit. It was the case, 200 years ago. Today, it takes one hour and a half to fly accross the country. People can live at one side of the country and go to work to the other side every damn day. Say to my face that there’s no obvious and clear accent “diaspora” happening in France… So no, no “natural” French accent anymore.

Swiss accent :
Swiss accent specifically is North-influenced. It holds a sort of distance and coldness typical from North countries, yet with a tiny touch of calmness as the Swiss are known for their natural great temper. It’s a calm, positive accent. You can compare it with other accents on my Accent Bible.

Québec case :

Another interesting story about French and accents is Québec’s accent. Québec’s accent is actually a Royal accent from the Versailles’ court, brought by the colonists. After French Revolution, this court accent was highly despised because it represented the Monarchy and the French prefered speaking with the “Poor” accent in a will of abolishing all bounds with the previous Monarchy (along other actions : they remaned the streets, changed the calendar… They just destroyed and replaced all Monarchy symbols by Revolutionary ones on every single level, including language). But there’s an ocean between France and Canada, and this gigantic turn in French slang didn’t cross the sea. Now, History being made, time flew on it too. French accent kept evolving with Latin and German influences as it always did, Québec with English language and American culture which is a completely new influence to French. So it’s the same root-language, yet there’s a gap, an ocean, Niagara Falls even, between both.

The same thing happens with other accents from the Islands, Africa or any oriental francophony. As long as you surround French with another culture unknown until yet, the initial language disconnects itself to adapt to the new culture. Like I say, French is born from influences, it adapts, it can get warmer, colder, calmer, tougher… you lose any grip you could possibly have on the “original” French accent if you confront it to a radical new influence. It just happens and you can’t do anything about it.

So, next time someone tells you that, just throw an etymology dictionary in their face and tell them to get fucking educated. I know I sound a little hormonal and righteous on this topic but historic and linguistic hypocrisy just gets on my nerves, it does… so hard.. xD

For anybody scared of speaking poor French in front of French people, that they will judge them on their bad accent and such,

Keep in mind that this is how our current president speaks English : 

And how speaks our previous president : 

So when I say don’t worry, DON’T WORRY. The French know the pain. They just do. 

French and its accents!

We all read this :

Ce matin, nous sommes tous arrivés à l’école bien contents, parce qu’on va prendre une photo de la classe qui sera pour nous un souvenir que nous allons chérir toute notre vie, comme nous l’a dit la maîtresse. Elle nous a aussi dit de venir bien propres et bien coiffés. C’est avec plein de brillantine sur la tête que je suis entré dans la cour de récréation. Tous les copains étaient déjà là et la maîtresse était en train de gronder Geoffroy qui était venu habillé en martien. Geoffroy a un papa très riche qui lui achète tous les jouets qu’il veut. Geoffroy disait à la maîtresse qu’il voulait absolument être photographié en martien et que sinon il s’en irait. 


France 

Bretagne, by thefrenchmessengers Charente, by hellwoodhyde Vaucluse, by enolah Midi-Pyrénées, by Em Paris, by Em

Francophone areas:

Ontario, by sieh Suisse, by maliseiya

Belgium, by Francesca

Merci à tous et n’hésitez pas à m’envoyer plus d’accents ! :) 

Le couperet est tombé : ce sont bien les Toulousains qui ont l’accent le plus sexy de France. Les Marseillais vont devoir ravaler leur fierté. Les deux régions se livrent une guerre sans merci pour savoir laquelle a le plus bel accent, et Midi-Pyrénées vient de remporter une bataille. Selon une étude du site de rencontres Parship, 70,2 % des Français pensent que l’accent toulousain est “le plus charmant”. Un tiers des personnes interrogées le jugent même “sexy”. L’accent marseillais, de son côté, est qualifié de “drôle” par 72,2 % des Français, vaincu sur le fil par l’accent chtimi, à 74 %. Voilà qui plaira aux habitants de la cité phocéenne ! Mais ces derniers peuvent se consoler avec la célébrité de leur accent, connu par 95 % des personnes interrogées, loin devant Toulouse (78 %).

"Le capital sympathie émanant d’une personne à l’accent chantant du Sud peut se révéler un véritable atout dans le jeu de la séduction", explique Parship. "Dans l’imaginaire collectif, les sonorités des accents du Sud évoquent la qualité de vie de cette région, l’ensoleillement", poursuit le communiqué. Fait surprenant, Parship considère qu’il existe un français "sans accent", qui correspond probablement à la façon de parler très neutre des présentateurs de journaux télévisés, ou alors à l’accent parisien, parfois jugé à tort dépourvu de mélodie. 

Dans la catégorie des accents intelligents, c’est l’accent breton qui rafle la mise, avec 26 % de soutien, mais il n’est connu que de 43 % des Français : c’est moins bien que l’accent alsacien (62 %). Les autres accents n’ont pas été pris en compte dans l’étude : dommage. “Pour ceux qui cherchent l’amour sur les sites de rencontres, peut-être est-il temps de préciser leur accent dans leur profil ?” conclut avec humour (ou pas) le communiqué. 

Appel aux Français!


Je vais essayer de faire une carte de France des accents (ou des francophonies!), étant donné que nos amis étrangers dévorent avec grand appétit ce genre de post ! Pour cela, j’aurais besoin de quelques volontaires en région qui auraient envie de propulser la beauté de leur accent sur la scène internationale (rien que ça…) 

Pour cela, rien de plus simple ! Il vous suffit de vous enregistrer en train de lire le texte suivant. Le dictaphone Iphone suffit très bien, ou un son webcam… Envoyez!  Je me débrouille ensuite pour le charger :)

Ce matin, nous sommes tous arrivés à l’école bien contents, parce qu’on va prendre une photo de la classe qui sera pour nous un souvenir que nous allons chérir toute notre vie, comme nous l’a dit la maîtresse. Elle nous a aussi dit de venir bien propres et bien coiffés.

C’est avec plein de brillantine sur la tête que je suis entré dans la cour de récréation. Tous les copains étaient déjà là et la maîtresse était en train de gronder Geoffroy qui était venu habillé en martien. Geoffroy a un papa très riche qui lui achète tous les jouets qu’il veut. Geoffroy disait à la maîtresse qu’il voulait absolument être photographié en martien et que sinon il s’en irait.

Merci de me contacter pour que je vous donne mon adresse email perso pour que vous m’envoyiez votre fichier son! Soyez sport les mecs, participez !!!

(Mis à jour >) 

France

Pour l’instant, j’ai : 
Accent Parisien - x
Accent Toulousain - x
Accent Picard
Accent Stéphanois
Accent Charentais
Accent Breton - x
Accent Avignonnais - x 

Hors France

Accent Québécois - x
Accent Suisse - x
Accent Belge



(Je rajouterai ce que j’ai reçu au fur et à mesure !)

MERCI !!!

How does one add emphasis in French? In English, all you have to do is stress a syllable or word loudly in a sentence and it causes emphasis. How is this achieved in French?


With the tone, I guess! French is like a song you’re singing. We have blanks, rapid words and accents we take our time on to make “the melody” flow. We emphasize by “changing” the melody, speaking it using higher ou deeper notes to change the rhythm, without necessarily speaking louder. We add a lot of onomatopoeia/sounds or short words to accelerate or soften the rythm like “ah, oh, huh, hm, ohla, ohlala, ah oui, mouais, pff, shh, tss, trop, putain, ouh, mhmm” or even, sounds with the tongue clapping on the palate, little whispers between the teeth etc..  

And we’re a latin country, we do faces a lot and we speak with our hands. That’s a key point in French communication ;)

Oui voilà, pincé, exactement! ils accentuent vachement sur les é je trouve, on a l'impression qu'ils viennent du nez et plus du fond du palet! Mais oui le français sans accent n'existe pas mais la majorité des français parlent un français quand même formalisé, on reconnaît les accents à des broutilles la plupart du temps (car il est vrai que les accents du sud, et aussi du nord sont très forts), ce qui est différent de nos pays voisins frontaliers où les accents sont bien plus prononcés


Tu veux dire ça?

Hahaha !

0 plays

Southern accent : Few lines from Le Petit Nicolas, chapter 1. 

Ce matin, nous sommes tous arrivés à l’école bien contents, parce qu’on va prendre une photo de la classe qui sera pour nous un souvenir que nous allons chérir toute notre vie, comme nous l’a dit la maîtresse. Elle nous a aussi dit de venir bien propres et bien coiffés.

C’est avec plein de brillantine sur la tête que je suis entré dans la cour de récréation. Tous les copains étaient déjà là et la maîtresse était en train de gronder Geoffroy qui était venu habillé en martien. Geoffroy a un papa très riche qui lui achète tous les jouets qu’il veut. Geoffroy disait à la maîtresse qu’il voulait absolument être photographié en martien et que sinon il s’en irait. 

default album art
Plays: 1,405

Parisian accent : Few lines from Le Petit Nicolas, chapter 1. 

Ce matin, nous sommes tous arrivés à l’école bien contents, parce qu’on va prendre une photo de la classe qui sera pour nous un souvenir que nous allons chérir toute notre vie, comme nous l’a dit la maîtresse. Elle nous a aussi dit de venir bien propres et bien coiffés.

C’est avec plein de brillantine sur la tête que je suis entré dans la cour de récréation. Tous les copains étaient déjà là et la maîtresse était en train de gronder Geoffroy qui était venu habillé en martien. Geoffroy a un papa très riche qui lui achète tous les jouets qu’il veut. Geoffroy disait à la maîtresse qu’il voulait absolument être photographié en martien et que sinon il s’en irait. 

Quelle est l'impression française du langage et de la culture d'Allemagne?


L’Allemagne est très en vogue à l’heure actuelle ! Beaucoup de Français partent s’installer en Allemagne (Cologne ou Berlin). La France est définitivement passée outre l’histoire de nos deux pays, surtout grâce à la jeune génération. Et je ne parle même pas du rôle essentiel de l’Allemagne dans la politique européenne qui lui accorde un rayonnement bien supérieur à la France (selon moi). 
Quant à la langue, elle est réputée pour être celle des scientifiques. Ce sont en général les étudiants amoureux des sciences et de la logique qui choisissent de la pratiquer - les littéraires lui préférant l’Espagnol ou l’Italien. Ça reste une langue perçue comme complexe et dure à maîtriser. En ce qui concerne sa “beauté”, c’est très subjectif. 

what does an american french accent sound to french speakers?... kind of how when french people speak english, all the words are slurred together and it sounds very snobby!

Anonymous

Do I sound snobby when I speak?! Oh my god… 
Well, the typical cliché is to say that Americans “cackle”, they insist on consonants while we focus on vowels. It feels like they are talking while holding their nose or not really breathing. 

I can add that in Lorraine, they often add a "le" or a "la" before a name. Example: "La Mélanie a fait ceci et celà." I've heard that it was only used there :o Along with the expression "entre midi" which is at school the moment between the last class of the morning and the first class of the afternoon.

Anonymous

Qu'est-ce que les Français pensent de l'accent américain? Je suis étudiante ici, et je me demandais toujours si les Français le trouvent bête ou pas...

Anonymous

Haha ! Ça dépend des gens…

En fait, techniquement, il est assez “bizarre” à l’oreille française. L’Américain est un accent très nasillard alors que le Français est plus guttural, donc ce sont des sons auxquels nous ne sommes pas habitués. C’est pour ça que certains Français ne l’aiment pas car ce sont des sons parfois “désagréables” quand l’accent est très fort.  L’Américain n’a pas d’amplitude ou de respiration comme le Français peut avoir, ça nous donne l’impression que la personne qui parle respire peu. 
Souvent on l’imite en faisant comme si c’était un canard qui parlait ou comme si on se pinçait le nez pour parler. Donc ça fait rire certains, ça en dérange d’autres ou alors les gens sont simplement indifférents. 

Personnellement, je l’aime beaucoup. Je le trouve beaucoup plus musical que l’accent britannique (qui est beaucoup plus “dur”) mais tout aussi joli. Il est juste différent. Mais je suppose que pour l’apprécier, il faut savoir apprécier les langues vraiment différentes à la notre.
C’est vrai que souvent en France, on aime bien l’Espagnol et l’Italien car ce sont des sons différents mais qui restent latins donc “faciles” à comprendre. Après, pas mal de personnes aiment l’Allemand, mais ce sont des sons auxquels nous sommes habitués pour des raisons historiques évidentes. L’Anglais (américain comme britannique) est une langue à laquelle nous sommes confrontés mais rarement parlée par des natifs. Donc forcément, quand on entend le “vrai” accent (je répète, américain comme britannique), ça nous fait tout bizarre ! :)