zeldathemes
Real insight on French culture from a French native point of view.
Mostly run by Em, 26, living in Paris.
Welcome to AwesomeFrench !
Liberté, Egalité, Croque au Comté

#Lovewithoutlocks

Because of #Lovelocks frenzy, this is what Le Pont des Arts looks like today : 

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Lovelocks are NOT a French tradition, THEY’RE A TREND tourists started 7 years ago. That’s how le Pont des Arts looked like 7 years ago and before : 

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It was a nice and romantic see-through bridge that NEVER meant to be destroyed by lovelocks. It was a place where artists used to gather to sing, to sell their paintings or simply have a drink. It has NEVER been designed to hold such a load of locks, which weighs TONS. The bridge is slowly falling apart, all the fences are giving way one by one. THIS HAS TO STOP. If you love Paris, protect its architecture from selfish lovers, make this spread! 

LOVELOCKS HAVE TO STOP, IT IS NOT A TRADITION, IT WON’T BRING ANY LUCK OR LOVE OR WHATEVER 

BUT IT WILL TAKE OUR BRIDGE DOWN ! 

For those in Paris this summer, a program of outdoor movies screenings ! And the movie selection is great this year !

Le Pont des Arts, Paris, 1910. 
Without locks !

Le Pont des Arts, Paris, 1910. 

Without locks !

"Café Français" 
Em Clouzet // Do not remove credit. 

"Café Français" 

Em Clouzet // Do not remove credit. 

Cool site :) Pictures of Parisians! 

Hey, ive been reffered to your blog by french-problems, Do you mind giving a break down of each arrondisement of Paris, be brutally honest! :)

Anonymous

Not sure if that’s what you expect but well : 

  1.  Museums and Asian tourists
  2. Cheap clothes and youth
  3. Contemporary art and design, gay-gay-gay-giddy-gays but only male and rich
  4. idyllic architecture, hotels particuliers, treasures at every corner
  5. Jardin des Plantes, Politics wanabees, strollers, TONS of strollers
  6. American tourists, Saint-Germain, rich people that like to think they’re hipsters 
  7. Catholic minefield, illegal street-sellers, Eiffel Tower
  8. Catholic Extremists, Offices, lively during the week, dead on saturdays & sundays
  9. Ancient art, second-hand artefacts, ramen, japonese and korean 
  10. La Bohème, small bars, cute nights on the Canal Saint-Martin, Little India
  11. Binge drinking. A LOT. 
  12. Lesboland, huge concerts at Bercy, fun to stroll around
  13. Residential, nuns, cute parks, Chinatown
  14. EXTREMELY residential, travellers shifting
  15. Nonexistant
  16. Sarkoland (rich and right wing people), housebreaking, 6€ for a fucking can of Coca Cola
  17. Pretty and representative
  18. Tourists, stree-sellers, a bit of romanticism
  19. The worst, like, I don’t even know where to begin
  20. Ultimate fav’ place in Paris aka Père Lachaise Cemetary, underground places, artistic, popular

Hahahahaha ! So so true ! 

Des gens sont morts à cause de la 18. 

hideback:

L’enfer Cabaret, Boulevard de Clichy, Montmartre, Paris

Built circa 1890; demolished circa 1952.

Entertainment inside the “inferno of hell” included musicians dressed as devils and interior volcanos that spewed scented lava of molten gold. 

After the “cabaret artistique” was demolished, the site became a Monoprix retail store.

Look at these babes!

The Panthéon is a building in the Latin Quarter in Paris. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve and to house the reliquary châsse containing her relics but, after many changes, now functions as a secular mausoleum containing the remains of distinguished French citizens.
The inscription above the entrance reads AUX GRANDS HOMMES LA PATRIE RECONNAISSANTE ( “To the great men, the grateful homeland”). By burying its great men in the Panthéon, the Nation acknowledges the honour it received from them. As such, interment here is severely restricted and is allowed only by a parliamentary act for “National Heroes”. Similar high honours exist in Les Invalides for historical military leaders such as Napoléon, Turenne and Vauban.
Among those buried in its necropolis are Voltaire, Rousseau, Victor Hugo, Émile Zola, Jean Moulin, Louis Braille, Jean Jaurès and Soufflot, its architect. Marie Curie is the only woman interred based on her own merits.

The Panthéon is a building in the Latin Quarter in Paris. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve and to house the reliquary châsse containing her relics but, after many changes, now functions as a secular mausoleum containing the remains of distinguished French citizens.

The inscription above the entrance reads AUX GRANDS HOMMES LA PATRIE RECONNAISSANTE ( “To the great men, the grateful homeland”). By burying its great men in the Panthéon, the Nation acknowledges the honour it received from them. As such, interment here is severely restricted and is allowed only by a parliamentary act for “National Heroes”. Similar high honours exist in Les Invalides for historical military leaders such as Napoléon, Turenne and Vauban.

Among those buried in its necropolis are Voltaire, Rousseau, Victor Hugo, Émile Zola, Jean Moulin, Louis Braille, Jean Jaurès and Soufflot, its architect. Marie Curie is the only woman interred based on her own merits.

My Trip to France : Paris, Quessoy, Bretagne

Last year I visited Paris and stayed there a cumulative total of two weeks (I visited France three times), and stayed in Quessoy, a small village near Rennes, Bretagne for about 2 weeks working at a music camp. 

In terms of Paris, I really loved the atmosphere; I’m from New York so I was very much used to the craziness of city-life, but Paris seemed a bit more relaxed. People walk generally slower; meals take much longer; people don’t seem to be in a rush all the time; women wear less makeup and guys wear more fitted clothing; the metro is much much cleaner than the nyc subway; things were different but not too different. I still felt like a city chick. The three big things that I did not like however was customer service, the amount of smoking especially among young people, and how everything closes on Sundays. 

In terms of working in Quessoy, Bretagne; that was an interesting experience because my french wasn’t so great (I could understand about 75% when spoken to but had trouble responding), so dealing with semi-bilingual kids (some spoke ok english some didn’t) and adults on a daily basis for 2 weeks really pushed me, but it was a good experience. In terms of the people that I’ve interacted with at the camp, people are similar no matter where you go so I didn’t really assume that there was going to be a great difference between the french and americans, but I noticed a few small things. People smile less but touch more; they are a bit quieter; jokes are a bit darker and sarcastic; people express emotions more freely; there’s more uniformity in attire; there’s less political correctness; but overall I didn’t notice any huge differences. Quessoy was very quiet, lots of cows, the people were nice, it was very relaxing, and there was lots of fog in the morning, but nothing was surprising. 

I loved France and I definitely plan on going back, hopefully for a longer period of time though. 

*sorry that this is really long but I tried cutting it down as much as I could*